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Friday, April 17
 

8:30am EDT

9:45am EDT

Opening & Keynote Address
Keynote TBA

Friday April 17, 2020 9:45am - 10:45am EDT
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

11:00am EDT

Building a solid foundation today for the future
There is definitely a need for new and innovative strategies on how we can address the guidance and management for students of African decent. I have designed a program that will transform, manage and align the educators mindset in understanding the African-Canadian youth of today.

Speakers

Friday April 17, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am EDT
Room #1

11:00am EDT

Each One, Teach One: a 3-Step Framework to Increased Student Success
As educators, we can empower youth to blossom to their fullest expression. In this session, educational partners will learn how to embed the Each One Teach One framework collaboratively within a school environment. Attendees will leave as empowered educators that are better equipped to understand and support the social, mental and educational needs of black youth.

Speakers
avatar for Jemmelia Morgan

Jemmelia Morgan

Youth Engagement Worker, Nexus Youth Services
If you’re looking for creative, relevant strategies to increase youth engagement and successful youth programs, Jemmelia is your go-to consultant. For the past 10 years, she has been making waves across the GTA for her successful group programs & workshops that focus on mental health... Read More →


Friday April 17, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am EDT
Room #3

11:00am EDT

Equity issues in school MakerSpaces
School MakerSpaces have become popular in K-12 across North America. These active centres of student inquiry have been designed in accordance with a blueprint that was produced within communities. The research on community MakerSpaces suggests that members of minoritized groups are under-represented.
What are the roots of under-representation and the potential consequences?
In what ways can MakerSpaces increase employment readiness and enhance knowledge of entrepreneurship for work-bound youth?
What are potential gaps between research and practice?



Friday April 17, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am EDT
Room #4

11:00am EDT

STEM Underachievement: Implications & Strategies for Engagement
Visions of Science serves youth living in low-income and racialized communities across the Greater Toronto Area to increase their STEM literacy and career aspirations. This presentation will discuss perceptions of achievement and their resulting implications as well as share learning models that facilitate achievement for those traditionally ́ 'underachieving' in STEM.



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Speakers
avatar for Eugenia Duodu

Eugenia Duodu

CEO | Chef de la direction, Visions of Science Network for Learning Inc.
Dr. Eugenia Duodu is the CEO of Visions of Science Network for Learning, a charitable organization that empowers youth from low-income communities through meaningful engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).She devotes her time to community and global outreach initiatives and participates in various boards, organizations, and councils... Read More →


Friday April 17, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am EDT
Room #5

11:00am EDT

Teaching Black Resistance
This workshop will provide an introduction for how to teach about histories of Black resistance at the elementary level using arts and STEM based activities.  It will present what FreedomSchool - Toronto has researched to be the 7 tenets of Black liberatory education in Canada, and will discuss their importance in supporting Black student excellence.


Friday April 17, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am EDT
Room #2

12:00pm EDT

Challenging the Narrative: Supporting Black Student Excellence
Participants explore targeted interventions of a Scarborough high-school that supports the learning and excellence of Black students, centred around anti-oppression and antiracism.
Topics include: a) Africentric education: The Leonard Braithwaite Program, b) Interdisciplinary course: Redefining the Mandem (Pre-LBP), c) Intentional interventions: Ensuring credit accumulation, d) Centering student activism: Black Brilliance (student-led conference)

Speakers
NA

Nicole Aloise, Rukiya Mohamed, Alana Lowe & Dayo Baiyewu

Principal, Winston Churchill CI, TDSB
The team is interested in Africentric education.


Friday April 17, 2020 12:00pm - 12:50pm EDT
Room #3

12:00pm EDT

Strategies for Developing Educator Critical Consciousness for Black Student Success and Excellence
Through a tiered and integrated professional learning paradigm, over 150 educators across 17 TDSB schools engaged in critically conscious practitioner inquiry to engage with issues of anti-Black racism. This session describes the professional learning and conditions for developing critical consciousness in relation to race and learning in pedagogy for educators.


Friday April 17, 2020 12:00pm - 12:50pm EDT
Room #4

12:00pm EDT

Teaching Black Students: Promoting identity, engagement and well-being in Mathematics
Shayle, Naima and Sherrika share their experience working in a learning community geared towards challenging barriers that exist for Black students in Mathematics. Collaboratively, they focused on teaching mathematics with student identity at the forefront of their pedagogy, and implemented equity-based practices which lead to an increase in achievement scores.


Friday April 17, 2020 12:00pm - 12:50pm EDT
Room #2

12:00pm EDT

Working with Black/Brown Males Who Have Experienced Trauma
Over 50% of students experience trauma in their lives and those students are 3 times likely to experience academic failure, 5 times likely for attendance problems and 6 times likely for behavioral problems. If you don't allow yourself to see who that student really is, you will only see what you expect to see. This interactive workshop will give educators and administrators strategies for working with students who experienced trauma while working on your own stress management.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Jackson

Robert Jackson

Robert Jackson Consulting
AFTERNOON KEYNOTE, THURSDAY, SEPT. 26Robert Jackson is an expert in teaching cultural diversity, restorative practices, socio-emotional learning, and how to retain troubled students in school. He teaches educators and administrators how to use their power more effectively to educate... Read More →


Friday April 17, 2020 12:00pm - 12:50pm EDT
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

1:00pm EDT

Lunch & Keynote Address
Speakers
avatar for Pat Case

Pat Case

Assistant Deputy Minister, Ontario Ministry of Education
Experienced Board Chair with a demonstrated history of success in public sector and broader public sector administration. My career has been equally split between the k-12 and post-secondary sectors. Skilled in Nonprofit Organizations, Program Evaluation, Human Rights and Equality... Read More →


Friday April 17, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

1:30pm EDT

2:10pm EDT

Black Brilliance Peer Learning Model
Black Brilliance is an organization run by Black students for Black students. Black Brilliance provides a conference for Black students every year and features student-run workshops on topics such as, Racism and Micro-aggressions, Police Brutality, Post Traumatic Slave Trauma, the Politics of Black Hair and other issues that reflect the lived realities of Black Youth. In the past 4 years, Black Brilliance has become the most anticipated event for Black students in the school calendar. What first started as an opportunity for Black students to come together to share their experiences and struggles has now grown into a movement. 

It has been well documented by many scholars like Carl James and Gillian Parekh that our existing school system fails to meet the needs of Black students. That Black students run and organize the conference is at the heart of its success. Peer learning as a pedagogy is a learning strategy which is now having global reach. Studies suggest that students who engage in peer learning are more engaged, are able to create a safe environment of open communication and discussion and may study and perform better academically. This workshop will show how a peer model is especially impactful for Black students who are marginalized by a Eurocentric curriculum and ways of teaching. This workshop will be presented by Black students/alumni and will outline the impact of the Black Brilliance model for Black students. Participants will learn about the principals of the Black Brilliance peer to peer model as a practice of cultural responsiveness. Participants will learn how to utilize this model which can be adapted for various marginalized students in educational settings. This workshop will be useful for teachers, students, Counselors, administrators, central office leaders, and other educators.

Speakers
KS

Kevin Sutton

Student Equity Program Advisor, Toronto District School Board


Friday April 17, 2020 2:10pm - 3:00pm EDT
Room #3

2:10pm EDT

Black Minds Matter
This workshop centers exemplary practices for Black students, applying principles of Africentricity. Educators will explore innovative teaching practices, through research in the area of culturally-responsive, and Africentric pedagogy. Because “Black Minds Matter”, we answer the fundamental question: How do we support psycho-social/psycho-emotional health for Black students?

Speakers
avatar for Malik Adams

Malik Adams

Counsellor, Halifax Regional
- 20-year educator in public school system in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada- curriculum developer (Social Studies and Language/Literature focusing on people of African Ancestry)- working with Black men in minimum, medium, and maximum Correctional institutions in eastern Canada- trained... Read More →


Friday April 17, 2020 2:10pm - 3:00pm EDT
Room #1

2:10pm EDT

Perception vs Persona
There is a dearth of educational leadership literature on the experiences of Canadian Black women school and system leaders. The absence of their voices in positions of leadership serves to keep invisible the ongoing systemic oppression that these leaders experience in their schools and boards. Additionally, the absence allows this oppression to evade dominant discourse on how racism and sexism operates in educational leadership in the Canadian context. Most importantly, such omissions result in systemic barriers failing to be explicitly addressed by school boards. Through an analysis of two qualitative studies with educational leaders focused on the factors contributing to the intersecting oppressions of being Black and female in education, this paper will reveal the ways in which dominant conceptualizations of educational leadership hinder opportunities for Black female educators and create challenges for aspiring leaders and those who are successfully placed in these roles.


Friday April 17, 2020 2:10pm - 3:00pm EDT
Room #2

2:10pm EDT

Practices for Developing Students’ Critical Consciousness for Black Student Success and Excellence
Confronting anti-Black racism workshop covers a brief history of the Black experience in Canada and addresses concepts such as White privilege, how anti-Black racism presents itself in the education system and in other public institutions, e.g. the child welfare system.

Speakers
KF

Keishia Facey

RFWC Consulting Services


Friday April 17, 2020 2:10pm - 3:00pm EDT
Room #4

3:10pm EDT

Confronting Anti-Black Racism in Kindergarten Training

The Confronting Anti-Black Racism in Kindergarten training was designed to address the inherent marginalization of Black students. Educators were given knowledge, tools and methods to identify, and apply critical equity frameworks within their pedagogy, interrogate dominant ideas that inform assumptions and stereotypes within their practice and undo, challenge and mitigate the oppressive impacts of anti-Black racism on students.



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Speakers
KF

Keishia Facey

RFWC Consulting Services


Friday April 17, 2020 3:10pm - 3:25pm EDT
Room #5

3:10pm EDT

African Nova Scotian Education Framework
My presentation will outline a comprehensive, provincial education framework developed by The African Canadian Services Branch within the NS Department of Education & Early Childhood Education. This framework is focused on impactful initiatives that will benefit the well-being and academic achievement of the 7,490 self-identified students of African ancestry in Nova Scotia. Our education framework consists of 5 fundamental pillars that drive our strategies: "Knowing them as they are known", authentic self-identification, empowering parents & families, educational programming and equitable access & involvement for ANS support staff. We will use a Sankofa-based theme to "look back as we move forward" - this includes a review of the historic 1994 BLAC report, Enid Lee's "Reality Check" and Avis Glaze's recent "Raise The Bar" (an evaluation of the entire education system in NS). I will also highlight where our Black students are now (achievement gap) and where we would like them to be in the near future. Nova Scotia is the only province in Canada that has a 'branch' in the Department of Education (20+ years) that is tasked with supporting Black students in the province. Nova Scotia is also the province with the largest Black populations whose roots go back 300 years (North Preston, East Preston, Hammonds Plains, Lincolnville, Sunnyville, Greenville, Lucasville, Birchtown, Weymouth Falls, Danvers, Beechville, Truro, Amherst, Gibson Woods...). 

Speakers
avatar for Agassou Jones

Agassou Jones

Director, African Canadian Services Branch
I have been an educator for more than 30 years. In that time I have been a high school English teacher, School of Education lecturer, university basketball head coach, co-writer of provincial curriculum and faciltator of many school-based professional development sessions . My education... Read More →


Friday April 17, 2020 3:10pm - 4:00pm EDT
Room #4

3:10pm EDT

Foregrounding mentoring relationships of Black female secondary school administrators
In this workshop I will present some findings from my recently completed PhD thesis.
The title of my thesis is: Mentoring Experiences of Black Female Public Secondary School Administrators in Southern Ontario. The administrators interviewed for this work pointed to the scarcity of Black administrators in Ontario secondary schools. Some of their mentoring experiences will be examined in this presentation.



Friday April 17, 2020 3:10pm - 4:00pm EDT
Room #3

3:10pm EDT

Practices for Developing Students’ Critical Consciousness for Black Student Success and Excellence
Educator teams across 17 TDSB elementary and secondary schools engaged in the parallel inquiry-based experience of developing their own critical consciousness as well as their students’. This session describes participating educators’ successful practices to support Black students’ success and excellence through the provision of student voice and leadership opportunities.


Friday April 17, 2020 3:10pm - 4:00pm EDT
Room #1

3:10pm EDT

What does Equity mean for racialized teachers and students?
Racialized bodies struggle in the our education system. The stories of struggle resonates with racialized  students and teachers. In this presentation we will highlight the struggles faced by teachers and students in K to 12 education.  IEP students are taught to advocate for themselves, yet transition plans are failing. The racialized teachers are unaware of the hidden curriculum to navigate institutional barriers. Let's begin the talk!

Speakers
MA

Miguel Angus

Teacher, TDSB
I am a black teacher interested in employment equity for black teachers.


Friday April 17, 2020 3:10pm - 4:00pm EDT
Room #2

5:45pm EDT

7:15pm EDT

 
Saturday, April 18
 

9:00am EDT

9:45am EDT

Opening & Keynote Address
Speakers
avatar for Natasha Henry

Natasha Henry

President, Ontario Black History Society
I have over sixteen years of classroom teaching, curriculum development, lesson planning, and programming experience.In my capacity as an accomplished author and Black History curriculum consultant, I have researched and produced numerous resources that highlight the African Diasporic... Read More →


Saturday April 18, 2020 9:45am - 10:30am EDT
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

10:40am EDT

Ain't I a Leader?: Black Mothers Partnering for Black Student Success & Excellence
This session explores the ways in which Black mothers affirm their role as educational leaders, within their children's schools and communities. 

Through spoken word, visual arts and short stories, four Black mothers share their leadership journey as experienced in a Toronto District School Board initiative.

Session facilitators link their own leadership work to current research and highlight how schools, community members and Black families can come together and engage in collective action for Black student success and excellence.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Fearon,  Keisha Evans, Chantell Richards & Fati Seidu

Stephanie Fearon, Keisha Evans, Chantell Richards & Fati Seidu

Coordinator, Equity and Model Schools for Inner Cities, Charles Gordon Senior Public School
We are a community-based project that teaches parents how to help their children read. We also work with local partners to promote and improve literacy in the communities that need it the most. We are passionate about Black caregiver engagement, community-school partnerships, and... Read More →


Saturday April 18, 2020 10:40am - 10:55am EDT
Room #4

10:40am EDT

I Define ME not Girl Drama!-Culturally Relevant Strategies
How does a girl Define her voice when Girl Drama is Real! Girl friendships are intense and all-encompassing from early elementary years on; but cliques, bullying, power struggles and an intense desire to belong create a ripe field for relational aggression. Literature reminds us that a girl’s “key support system is – her tribe – which consists of peers who are also as reactive and erratic as they will ever be. (She) works hard every day to harness powerful and unpredictable emotions so that she can get on with doing everything else she means to do.

 In this session,  we will discuss the impact of social aggression and the factors that motivate relational aggression. We will share tools to develop a trauma-free space to promote girls  to define their voices, harness positive power, increasing emotional intelligence, and develop literacy skills through a culturally relevant model to increase girl empowerment. 

We will offer tools to implement strategies promoting SEL, restorative justice practices that strengthen and promote resiliency in girls will be explored. You will discover tools for promoting pro-social behaviors like kindness, sharing and empathy in girls K-12, while improving their attitude toward school and reducing depression.

Speakers
avatar for Tracie Berry-McGhee & Kiana McKinney

Tracie Berry-McGhee & Kiana McKinney

Speaker, Counselor, Author, Executive Director, SistaKeeper Empowerment Center
Tracie Berry-McGhee, M.Ed., LPC is the Founder of the SistaKeeper Empowerment Center, founded in STL. Mo. in 2002, in her Ferguson/Florissant School District. A Licensed Therapist, Mentor, National Motivational speaker. As a Psycho-Therapist, she has created research- based SEL curricula... Read More →


Saturday April 18, 2020 10:40am - 11:30am EDT
Room #2

10:40am EDT

Making Connections - Embracing Equity
My personal story is one of triumph in the face of insurmountable obstacles. I was born into poverty and attended schools with the worst reputations in Kingston, Jamaica, where days saw me running for my life to escape bullets, in order to get to my school. The effect of those experiences was negated by me having one amazing teacher who believed in my potential and created an atmosphere where I, along with other students, could thrive and dream big. Today, as an educator of 20 years, in three continents, a social justice advocate, I am 100% confident that if teachers and administrators understand what equitable practices will do for their students, they would not make the curriculum content their priority, but EQUITY. When equity is embraced and infused in ALL aspects of a teacher or administrator's decisions, progress will be made in the mindsets of children, especially those, who like me, had the odds stacked against them. Today, I am successful because of my teacher. I will show teachers and administrators practical ways of infusing equity in their practices. I may have a parent who will share a brief testimonial as to how her engagement with my class, helped both her and her child.

Speakers
NN

Nadia Nembhard-Hunt

Educator/Author/Empowerment Coach, DDSB


Saturday April 18, 2020 10:40am - 11:30am EDT
Room #1

10:40am EDT

Restorative Discipline Practices
This workshop will support the culture of the school by fostering effective communication and relationship building for all members of the school family. Restorative Discipline in schools create opportunities for adults and students to respond to conflict in a healthy manner. This interactive session will provide educators with effective strategies to build caring relationships through shared values and intentionality  to improve student achievement, as well as provide educators with the tools to build, maintain and repair relationships that have been harmed. Participants will receive  vital handouts on Restorative Discipline Practices, the different types of restorative circles, completed sample lesson plans, a blank lesson plan template and a list of websites for additional resources to implement restorative discipline in your school and district.

Speakers
avatar for Nicola Myers Gardere

Nicola Myers Gardere

Assistant Principal
My name is Nicola Myers Gardere, I am an Assistant Principal, Trainer of Trainers for Restorative Discipline Practices in Texas, International guest speaker and a scholar. I hold a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Services management, A masters in Curriculum and Instruction/English... Read More →


Saturday April 18, 2020 10:40am - 11:30am EDT
Room #3

11:40am EDT

At The Intersections of Race and Dis/ability: Experiences of Black Canadian Families and the Special Education Designation Process
In Canada, recent research evidence reveals Black Canadian students in special education are over-represented in special education programs and are also over represented in post-secondary vocational (applied) schools (Robson, Anisef, Brown and Parekh, 2014).  In fact, according to Toronto District School Board statistics, the intersections of race and disability for Black Canadian students decrease the chances of attending college or university (Robson, Anisef, Brown and Parekh, 2014). College and University degrees are pathways to professional careers with average to high paying careers (Crawford, Macmillan, Vignoles, and Wyness 2016).

Consequently, for Black students negatively affected by disproportionality, their ability to obtain a college or university degree leading to a professional career, is severely diminished (Robson, Anisef, Brown and Parekh, 2014). Low paying jobs and unemployment can lead to a poor quality of life (Crawford et al., 2016). Poor socioeconomic outcomes contribute to poor health outcomes and direct links between discrimination, stress response and poor physical health are well established in the research (Patterson and Veenstra, 2016).

Parents of children with special needs face unique challenges when navigating school systems primarily aimed at supporting “typical” students. Assessments, tests, individualized learning plans and services are common facets of special education programming that can for some, be intimidating and frustrating (Starr and Foy, 2012).

In addition to the unique challenges of the special education system, Black Canadian parents must also navigate cultural differences encountered with staff and school administration, barriers not experienced by their Caucasian and non-Black counterparts. Navigating cultural spaces within the special education system is an additional burden Black parents face, which may or may not have an impact on the quantity and quality of special education service delivery (Stanley, 2015).

Speakers

Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #4

11:40am EDT

Black Student Excellence - Primary, Junior & Intermediate Grades
What happens when we explore text detailing the historical and lived experiences of African Canadians? Explore Black Student Excellence through Culturally Relevant and Responsive Pedagogy for student achievement in a Canadian context through the use of literary responses and Community Circles.

Speakers

Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #2

11:40am EDT

Creating the Conditions for Equity in Educational Leadership
This session will focus on one Black school leader’s journey to successfully creating more space for authentic conversations and actions around equity with her predominantly white staff. The additional emotional burden that this work can add to leaders from marginalized groups and suggestions for self-care will also be briefly explored.



Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #1

11:40am EDT

Partnering for Literacy: Schools, Community and Black Parents
When schools, community organizations and families partner to support student achievement, everyone benefits. This session explores how The Reading Partnership (TRP) – a community based organization partners with the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) and Black parents to improve literacy acquisition amongst Black students ages 4 to 6.  TRP integrates a strengths-based approach, and evidence-based methods, into the development and delivery of its early childhood literacy program - Reading Partnership for Black Parents (RPBP). The program empowers Black parents/caregivers with the tools, confidence, and support needed to teach their children to read. This workshop will describe how the RPBP program, originally designed as a community-based literacy initiative, was adapted to a school-based model replicable for any school board.

Speakers
CC

Camesha Cox

Project Director, The Reading Partnership


Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #3

12:30pm EDT

Lunch & Keynote Address
Speakers
avatar for Principal Baruti Kafele

Principal Baruti Kafele

A highly-regarded urban educator in New Jersey for over twenty years, Principal Baruti Kafele distinguished himself as a master teacher and a transformational school leader. As an elementary school teacher in East Orange, NJ, he was selected as the East Orange School District and... Read More →


Saturday April 18, 2020 12:30pm - 2:00pm EDT
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

1:30pm EDT

2:10pm EDT

The Engaged Black Parent
Through the community consultations for Towards Race Equity in Education Black students, parents, and teachers shared that parents are critical to ensuring race equity in education. However, Black parents shared that they do not always have the knowledge to successfully navigate the public school system. The Engaged Parent series of information sheets was developed to fill this information gap. This session will introduce participants to the issues Black students face in Ontario’s public education system and share these tools and strategies that parents and caregivers can use to support their children in the public education system.


Saturday April 18, 2020 2:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Room #2

2:10pm EDT

Black Student Achievement and School Leadership
School leadership is a valuable partner in facilitating high levels of achievement for black students. Engaging Critical Theory is helpful in unseating assumptions, pedagogical practices, and structures that re-inscribe and reinforce white supremacy. Leadership that engages the humanity of the black student impacts engagement and will change the achievement trajectory.

Speakers

Saturday April 18, 2020 2:10pm - 3:00pm EDT
Room #4

2:10pm EDT

Leadership for Equity & Social Justice
Leadership preparation programs for social justice can transform the culture, curriculum, pedagogical practices and school priorities, to address the barriers towards equitable outcomes for marginalized students (Theoharis, 2007).  This research paper explores educational leadership in the context of diversity, leadership for social justice and the barriers faced by educational leaders who advocate to reduce inequities to give voice to the marginalized.  The proposed research will add to the body of knowledge pertaining to leadership preparation programs.  It will be conducted using a critical theoretical framework and the method of data collection will be interviews.



Request sent to owner.

Speakers
AL

Audrey Littlejohn

Teacher, OISE


Saturday April 18, 2020 2:10pm - 3:00pm EDT
Room #3

2:10pm EDT

One Planet, Two Worlds: Poverty Reduction and S.T.E.M. access (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in the era of the 4th industrial revolution
In an increasingly technology driven world people in poverty have limited access to STEM and financial education resources and opportunities which is widening the gap between the Rich and Poor. Today, Curtis Carmichael shares his life story of how he went from the streets of Toronto to breaking the cycle of poverty after receiving access to the tools of mental wellness, financial literacy, economic empowerment, business ownership and S.T.E.M. Though we live in the same world, we don’t share the same lived experiences as those in poverty. Using a powerful conversational approach, Curtis’s life as a national educator & activist will inspire audiences to find their role to make a difference in the lives of 21st century children & youth living in impoverished communities across Canada and beyond.



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Speakers
avatar for Curtis Carmichael

Curtis Carmichael

Director, Keynote Speaker, STEM Educator, Team Canada Duathlete & Activist, Code Ninjas Brampton, Coding and STEM Centre
Curtis Carmichael is a graduate of Queen’s University and Ontario Tech University. He is a professional speaker, STEM and Hip-Hop educator, cross-Canada cyclist, activist, social entrepreneur and the Director of Code Ninjas Brampton, a coding and STEM centre teaching kids ages 5-14... Read More →


Saturday April 18, 2020 2:10pm - 3:00pm EDT
Room #1

3:10pm EDT

Black Parent Engagement and Supports for Black Learners in K-12
This presentation will provide all those who have a vested interest in Black student achievement, with research and tangible strategies to support our learners as they grow from Kindergarten to twelfth grade. Parents, educational leaders, and post-secondary student associations would benefit from listening to how we can continue to empower Black parents to be active and influential as they guide their child through the public education system in Canada. This workshop will provide strategies to connect publicly funded elementary and high schools and community partners to assist in making schools more culturally responsive.

Speakers
TD

Tia Duke

Educator and Curriculum Leader, OCT


Saturday April 18, 2020 3:10pm - 4:00pm EDT
Room #3

3:10pm EDT

Leading While Black
There is a dearth of educational leadership literature on the experiences of Canadian Black women school and system leaders. The absence of their voices in positions of leadership serves to keep invisible the ongoing systemic oppression that these leaders experience in their schools and boards. Additionally, the absence allows this oppression to evade dominant discourse on how racism and sexism operates in educational leadership in the Canadian context. Most importantly, such omissions result in systemic barriers failing to be explicitly addressed by school boards. Through an analysis of two qualitative studies with educational leaders focused on the factors contributing to the intersecting oppressions of being Black and female in education, this paper will reveal the ways in which dominant conceptualizations of educational leadership hinder opportunities for Black female educators and create challenges for aspiring leaders and those who are successfully placed in these roles.



Request sent to owner.


Saturday April 18, 2020 3:10pm - 4:00pm EDT
Room #2

3:10pm EDT

“What Happened to Black People, Yo?”: Race, Gender and the Subjectivities of Black Male Teachers in Toronto
A widely held belief is that positive black role models—mainly black male teachers—can assist black youth to achieve higher levels of education and life success. Yet, little research explores the experiences of Toronto black male teachers as both professionals and potential role models. My research examines the following: How do black male teachers in Toronto experience their education environments (e.g. students, colleagues, administrators and local communities)? How do black male teachers understand the intersection of race and masculinity in their teaching experiences? What are the perspectives of black male teachers on any existing and needed support systems in Toronto schools?


Speakers

Saturday April 18, 2020 3:10pm - 4:00pm EDT
Room #1

4:10pm EDT

 


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