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Workshop 6 [clear filter]
Saturday, April 18
 

11:40am EDT

At The Intersections of Race and Dis/ability: Experiences of Black Canadian Families and the Special Education Designation Process
In Canada, recent research evidence reveals Black Canadian students in special education are over-represented in special education programs and are also over represented in post-secondary vocational (applied) schools (Robson, Anisef, Brown and Parekh, 2014).  In fact, according to Toronto District School Board statistics, the intersections of race and disability for Black Canadian students decrease the chances of attending college or university (Robson, Anisef, Brown and Parekh, 2014). College and University degrees are pathways to professional careers with average to high paying careers (Crawford, Macmillan, Vignoles, and Wyness 2016).

Consequently, for Black students negatively affected by disproportionality, their ability to obtain a college or university degree leading to a professional career, is severely diminished (Robson, Anisef, Brown and Parekh, 2014). Low paying jobs and unemployment can lead to a poor quality of life (Crawford et al., 2016). Poor socioeconomic outcomes contribute to poor health outcomes and direct links between discrimination, stress response and poor physical health are well established in the research (Patterson and Veenstra, 2016).

Parents of children with special needs face unique challenges when navigating school systems primarily aimed at supporting “typical” students. Assessments, tests, individualized learning plans and services are common facets of special education programming that can for some, be intimidating and frustrating (Starr and Foy, 2012).

In addition to the unique challenges of the special education system, Black Canadian parents must also navigate cultural differences encountered with staff and school administration, barriers not experienced by their Caucasian and non-Black counterparts. Navigating cultural spaces within the special education system is an additional burden Black parents face, which may or may not have an impact on the quantity and quality of special education service delivery (Stanley, 2015).

Speakers

Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #4

11:40am EDT

Black Student Excellence - Primary, Junior & Intermediate Grades
What happens when we explore text detailing the historical and lived experiences of African Canadians? Explore Black Student Excellence through Culturally Relevant and Responsive Pedagogy for student achievement in a Canadian context through the use of literary responses and Community Circles.

Speakers

Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #2

11:40am EDT

Creating the Conditions for Equity in Educational Leadership
This session will focus on one Black school leader’s journey to successfully creating more space for authentic conversations and actions around equity with her predominantly white staff. The additional emotional burden that this work can add to leaders from marginalized groups and suggestions for self-care will also be briefly explored.



Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #1

11:40am EDT

Partnering for Literacy: Schools, Community and Black Parents
When schools, community organizations and families partner to support student achievement, everyone benefits. This session explores how The Reading Partnership (TRP) – a community based organization partners with the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) and Black parents to improve literacy acquisition amongst Black students ages 4 to 6.  TRP integrates a strengths-based approach, and evidence-based methods, into the development and delivery of its early childhood literacy program - Reading Partnership for Black Parents (RPBP). The program empowers Black parents/caregivers with the tools, confidence, and support needed to teach their children to read. This workshop will describe how the RPBP program, originally designed as a community-based literacy initiative, was adapted to a school-based model replicable for any school board.

Speakers
CC

Camesha Cox

Project Director, The Reading Partnership


Saturday April 18, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm EDT
Room #3
 


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